DAA to seek changes to restrictions on aircraft movements for new runway

Fingal County Council’s airport noise authority will be asked to alter planning conditions

Aer Lingus aircraft at Dublin Airport. Under EU legislation, flights can be restricted only where other measures to ease aircraft noise will not work. Photograph: Cyril Byrne

Aer Lingus aircraft at Dublin Airport. Under EU legislation, flights can be restricted only where other measures to ease aircraft noise will not work. Photograph: Cyril Byrne

 

Dublin Airport owner DAA is likely to apply shortly to Fingal County Council’s Airport Noise Competent Authority to change planning conditions attached to its new runway after the body was formally established yesterday.

From this month, Fingal has responsibility for the authority, which will “assess current and predicted future levels of noise at Dublin Airport” under legislation passed by the Oireachtas this year.

DAA is likely to apply to the new authority to change terms restricting aircraft movements at Dublin Airport to 65 between 11pm and 7am, and barring any planes from taking off or landing on its new north runway, which is now under construction.

An Bord Pleanála imposed the conditions in 2007 when it gave DAA permission to build the runway and they will apply once it is being used. However, the State-owned airport company says the terms would limit flights at its busiest times, between 11pm and midnight and 6am and 7am.

Fingal has appointed Gilbert Power, director of service with the north Dublin county council, as director of the Aircraft Noise Competent Authority, which will employ engineers, technical staff and administrators.

Data on noise

Mr Power said that the body’s initial work would be to train staff and review existing data on noise at Dublin Airport.

Minister for Transport Shane Ross nominated Fingal County Council as the noise regulator in 2017, but legislation was needed so the local authority could be appointed to the role.

Under EU legislation, flights can be restricted only where other measures to ease aircraft noise will not work. Other measures can include using less noisy aircraft and landing approaches that cause less disturbance to locals.

County council interim chief executive AnnMarie Farrelly noted that the local authority already had a track record in managing the environment and planning, and would “now continue this in the area of aircraft noise regulation”.