Precipitous revenue slump, Deliveroo goes convenient; and data protection fears

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Delivery company Deliveroo is adapting to the new reality, signing deals with most of the major convenience store brands to offer a grocery delivery service to customers.

Delivery company Deliveroo is adapting to the new reality, signing deals with most of the major convenience store brands to offer a grocery delivery service to customers.

 

Half of Irish small and medium-sized businesses expect revenue to decline by at least 60 per cent over the next three months, according to a major new survey, with more than six out of 10 companies have already sought a deferral on payments of some sort, writes Cliff Taylor

One company looking to diversify its offering as restaurant outlets close due to the virus is delivery company Deliveroo. Peter Hamilton reports that it is adapting to the new reality, signing deals with most of the major convenience store brands to offer a grocery delivery service to customers.

And the Government moved yesterday to announce a major expansion of financial support for small- and medium-sized businesses impacted by the coronavirus crisis. Charlie Taylor has the details.

Ornua, the State’s largest dairy exporter, and owner of the Kerry gold brand, has pledged that it will maintain its €1 billion in purchase agreements with suppliers in Ireland despite a major slump in dairy demand on foot of Covid-19, the company tells Eoin Burke-Kennedy.

Elsewhere, online retail giant Amazon has started operating its own dedicated cargo aircraft to Belfast International Airport to service increasing numbers of internet shoppers in the North. Francess McDonnell reports on good news for troubled Belfast International Airport.

Not so good for the world’s poor, with Oxfam warning in a new report that the economic fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic could push half a billion more people into poverty unless action is taken to bail out developing countries. Laura Slattery reports.

Ciara O’Brien writes that technology is helping us work around Covid-19, with a variety of social bonding platforms and apps but scammers and hackers are still out there and data protection fears are very justified

Speaking of data protection, Karlin Lillington again turns her attention to the plethora of apps offering to “help” during the coronavirus crisis – especially in the area of health tracking – and questions whether, even apart from data privacy concerns, they can deliver on their promises.

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