Majority of school-goers will work in jobs that don’t currently exist, Ibec says

Digitalisation and changing lifestyles are transforming careers, says lobbying group

Students  will have held an average of 10 to 12 jobs by the time they reach the age of 38, according to Ibec

Students will have held an average of 10 to 12 jobs by the time they reach the age of 38, according to Ibec

 

Ireland needs to prepare a fast-evolving labour market as more than 60 per cent of current school-goers will end up in jobs that do not exist today, according to business lobbying group Ibec.

Launching a new campaign called “Smarter World, Smarter Work”, Ibec has called for a new approach to flexible working, better support for those out of work and labour market rules that actively encourage job creation. This will require a reform of childcare, retirement and pensions policy, and an overhaul of the social protection system.

“Rapid digitalisation, changing lifestyles and demographic shifts mean jobs and careers are being transformed,” said Maeve McElwee, director of employer relations at Ibec.

“This brings great opportunities, but also risks. A new era of quality job creation and improved living standards is possible. But we need to embrace technological and workplace change in business and right across society.”

Employability skills

Estimates suggest that students currently in the education system will have held an average of 10 to 12 jobs by the time they reach the age of 38, according to Ibec.

Meanwhile, Ibec’s report on graduate employability skills found that less than 45 per cent of respondents were satisfied with job candidates’ entrepreneurial and business acumen skills. While over 75 per cent of employers were confident of graduates having the academic knowledge, but less confident about graduates having the right attitude and aptitude towards work.

“To address this, business, government and educators must work much closer with each other. Employers need to provide work placements and work-related projects, engage with students in the classroom and help with career clinics,” Ms McElwee said.