Angling Notes: IFI launch online sea angling survey

Findings will aid the management of stocks and conservation efforts

 

An online survey to gather information from Irish sea anglers on behaviours, attitudes and catch preferences, was launched last week by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI).

The survey, the first of its kind at national level, is part of a new programme, entitled: Irish Marine Recreational Sea Angling Survey (IMREC).

The findings will help form part of a larger project with the aim of improving the management of stocks and to support conservation efforts, thereby increasing stock levels for sea anglers into the future.

Information gleaned from the study will feed into the IMREC project to be analysed by researchers, which is funded by the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund.

Dr Gallagher, IFI’s Head of Research and Development, said: “We know there are about 126,000 sea anglers in Ireland and we hope they will help us find out how often people go fishing, what they catch and what they release. Sea angling is an important activity and we want to ensure the future of the resource.

“Data collected will inform management decisions and prevent the use of worst-case scenarios, which can happen when there is a degree of uncertainty surrounding information.”

The survey takes about 10-20 minutes and entrants will receive an Angling Ireland neck buff and line clipper. Participants will also have a chance of winning one of three sets of tackle vouchers (1st prize – €200; 2nd prize – €150; 3rd prize – €100).

To take part in the survey, visit: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/IMRECSurvey and for more information on IMREC, see: https://www.fisheriesireland.ie/Projects/imrec.html.Shore anglers will, no doubt, respond to the survey with regard to the very serious coastal erosion which is rapidly eating away our precious beaches, particularly along the east/south-east coastline.

Responding to news that Courtown Beach in Co Wexford is to lose its Blue Flag status due to coastal erosion and the ‘disappearance’ of all its sand last week, Green MEP, Grace O’Sullivan says Courtown is just one example of the many beaches being impacted by erosion.

“Throughout the country, our shores are being ravaged by erosion which has been exacerbated in recent years due to climate change. Courtown is a dramatic example with its beautiful golden sands effectively swept away virtually overnight.

“But all along the coast erosion is to be seen, both on the shores and in rock faces of our cliffs and surrounding lands. It is imperative that a coastal erosion strategy is put in place. We are a small island nation and our shores are particularly vulnerable to the effects of growing coastal erosion as a result of climate change,” Ms O’Sullivan said.

Fishing’s Strangest Days

A fishy sea tale from the files of Tom Quinn’s book, Fishing’s Strangest Days.

Christchurch Harbour in Dorset is home to a local population of thin-lipped mullet. In 1982, a well-known sea fisherman paid a visit to Christchurch in search of the thin-lipped.

There were plenty of them, they took spinners freely and were hard fighters. The British record stood at less than two pounds and the thin-lipped in Christchurch Harbour were known to average just under the existing record.

Then one day is happened. A fishing journalist was out boat fishing in the harbour when, first cast, he hooked a mullet of over two and a half pounds. He took his fish to the fishery experts at London’s National History Museum, who confirmed its thin-lipped status.

The mullet went into the museum’s stores (where it remains to this day) and the journalist’s name went into the record books.

News of the latest British record took the angling world by storm. But inevitably, given the involvement of journalists, the story came out all wrong and even the Angling Times, described the fish in a ground-breaking feature as a ‘thin-legged mullet’.

But the record did not survive for long. After an epic battle in Christchurch Harbour the following year, an even bigger thin-lipped mullet was landed. This time the lucky angler was aged four.

Sprint salmon

Martin Davison of Foxford, Co Mayo caught and released the first spring salmon at the Ridge Pool last Tuesday on a Green-butted Cascade fly.

angling@irishtimes.com.

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