Alberto Salazar appeals four-year ban to Court of Arbitration for Sport

American coach challenges ban for breaching doping regulations

Alberto Salazar has appealed his four-year ban to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. Photograph:  Christian Petersen/Getty Images

Alberto Salazar has appealed his four-year ban to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. Photograph: Christian Petersen/Getty Images

 

Alberto Salazar has appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (Cas) against the four-year ban handed down by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (Usada).

The 61-year-old American, who coached British four-time Olympic champion Mo Farah between 2011 and 2017, was punished for breaching doping regulations but has sought to challenge that decision.

Dr Jeffrey Brown, who worked with Salazar at the recently closed Nike Oregon Project athletic facility (NOP), has also appealed to Cas having been hit with a matching ban.

Both men have asked for extra leave to prepare their cases in Lausanne and are due to be given at least four months to do so.

A Cas statement read: “The Court of Arbitration for Sport has registered the appeals filed by Mr Alberto Salazar and Dr Jeffrey Brown against the United States Anti-Doping Agency (Usada) in relation to the decisions rendered by the American Arbitration Association, North American Court of Arbitration for Sport Panel on 30 September 2019 and 7 October 2019, respectively, in which they were found to have committed anti-doping rule violations and sanctioned with a four-year period of ineligibility.

“Two Cas arbitration procedures have been opened. The parties have requested additional time to file their written submissions and evidence. Accordingly, at this stage, it appears that the hearings in these two matters are unlikely to take place before March 2020.”

UK anti-doping has vowed to work with its global counterpart, Wada, on any investigations concerning specific athletes linked to Salazar and the NOP.

Farah, who has won gold in the 5,000m and 10,000m at each of the last two Olympics, has never failed a drugs test and has always strenuously denied breaking any anti-doping regulations.

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