Jim Gavin defends Dublin fixtures being played at Croke Park

‘We’ll play and we’ve always played where we’re told to play,’ says Dublin manager

County captains at Farmleigh yesterday: Kildare’s Eamonn Callaghan, Donal Keegan of Meath, Paul McConway of Offaly, John O’Loughlin of Laois, Denis Bastick of Dublin, Kevin Diffley of Longford, Dean Healy of Wicklow, Ciaran Lyng of Wexford, Adrian Reid of Louth and Kieran Nolan of Carlow. Photograph: Inpho.

County captains at Farmleigh yesterday: Kildare’s Eamonn Callaghan, Donal Keegan of Meath, Paul McConway of Offaly, John O’Loughlin of Laois, Denis Bastick of Dublin, Kevin Diffley of Longford, Dean Healy of Wicklow, Ciaran Lyng of Wexford, Adrian Reid of Louth and Kieran Nolan of Carlow. Photograph: Inpho.

 

Jim Gavin politely deals with the annual cries for Dublin to be forced out of Croke Park. How it is unfair. How sending them to a province ground would be punishment for the county that has won nine of the last 10 Leinster titles.

All this despite the financial reality of that ever happening looking highly unlikely. A simple case of supply and demand. Not many provincial grounds could cater for the number of Dublin supporters that would travel.

“From the Dublin football team’s perspective, we’ll play and we’ve always played where we’re told to play,” said Gavin in full diplomatic mode. “And there may be a bit more of an advantage for a team, too, that gets to spend a little bit more time together on the day – they get a chance to talk and to see how players are feeling rather than just meeting and going to Croke Park.”

Nor does he believe the sport is on its last legs.

“A lot of people referred to the Dublin-Derry game, but from a coaching perspective it was intriguing to be involved in. At the end of that game we won by double scores and we tried a lot of new things out. They played a very, very solid game, similar to Tyrone. I think that’s the evolution of the game and it was fascinating to be involved in the centre of it.”

Lingering worry

The concern is adaptability to defensive structures but, in reality, until Ryan McHugh’s goal just before half-time, Dublin had threatened to pulverise the Ulster champions.

Second Captains

“I think we’ve always been adaptable. Last year, on the day, we were beaten by the better team in the championship but we’ve always tried to play an adaptable type of game, depending on what type of game teams will employ against us.

“But as I said, most of our focus in all of our sessions goes on the way we like to play the game of football and sometimes you can play that expansive type of game and sometimes you can’t.

“If you can’t you just need to have different systems and plans in place and to that end I feel the national league was very fruitful for us.”

A third division one title in succession followed. Feel any sense of history leading Dublin to three in a row?

“No,” Gavin replied matter-of-factly. “It’s for the players themselves. It’s something they’ll look back on at the end of their careers, that they’ve won three national leagues. It is a great achievement for them.

‘Strong position’

“We’ve been inconsistent in the league. They know it and I know it so we’ve a lot of work to do to try and get that consistency from the start, in our opening round against Offaly or Longford.

“It’s winner-takes-all. The Leinster championship means a lot to Dublin and we want to retain the Delaney Cup. That’s our ambition this year.”

It used to feel like a far greater achievement when Meath were a footballing superpower. There are signs of revival but not to the extent where anyone expects them or any other county to deny Dublin a 54th provincial coronation.

Meath, seeking their 22nd, can meet them in the final.

“Micko [O’DOWD)]is always striving for like that extra step each year,” said captain Donal Keoghan. “It’s a three-year process that he outlined at the start of it. We are two and half years into that now, just missed out on promotion two years in a row, but it can be seen as a progression in the right direction.”

How will this three-year cycle be considered a success?

“We would have to have medals around the neck. We are going to have to really target Leinster this year. That’s our main target for sure.”

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.