Croke Park profitability falls for 2015

Lack of an American football match in 2014 and no hurling replay impacted on revenue

GAA Director General Páraic Duffy, GAA President Aogán Ó Fearghail, GAA Director of Finance Tom Ryan and Peter McKenna, Commercial Manager of the GAA and Stadium Director of Croke Park. Photo: Donall Farmer/Inpho

GAA Director General Páraic Duffy, GAA President Aogán Ó Fearghail, GAA Director of Finance Tom Ryan and Peter McKenna, Commercial Manager of the GAA and Stadium Director of Croke Park. Photo: Donall Farmer/Inpho

 

Croke Park’s profitability fell in 2015 by €1.8 million, a fall attributed by stadium director Peter McKenna to the absence of 2014’s American football match as well as there being no All-Ireland hurling replay.

Revenues were down €4 million - the match between Penn State and the University of Central Florida brought in €3 million for the stadium 18 months ago although the event ultimately just broke even.

There was an improved performance from the food and beverages and meetings income, which helped to offset the decline in other revenues.

Asked were there plans for concerts this year, McKenna said: “Yeah, we’re very hopeful for a number of concerts. Hopefully we’ll get to three.”

He declined however to comment on recent speculation that Bruce Springsteen would be playing the stadium.

Match day revenues fell by €600,000, as average attendances in Croke Park declined from 37,027 to 35,725, a drop McKenna partly attributed to Dublin’s domination of the province’s football championship.

He said that the next big project in the stadium would be the development of a “state of the art handball centre”.

A special grant of €1 million was made to the Croke Park Museum, which attracted 137,000 visitors last year and was again listed as one of website TripAvisor’s top 10 attractions in Dublin.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.