‘Hauntings Soldier’

 

A chara,– Perhaps the sculpture of a first World War solider in St Stephen’s Green could be surrounded by several strands of blood-spattered barbed wire in order to protect it. This in my opinion would make it a far more appropriate and realistic memorial to the millions slaughtered in that war. – Is mise,

KEVIN P McCARTHY,

Killarney,

Co Kerry.

Sir, – Ignatius Langan (1893-1941), my mother’s uncle, suffered severe shell shock in the first World War and never recovered. No paint-throwing saddo can ever sully his good name or that of his comrades. Let’s ignore this cheap stunt and walk on. – Yours, etc,

KARL MARTIN,

Bayside,

Dublin 13.

A chara, – I am at pains to think of a six-metre statue anywhere in Ireland of Connolly, Pearse, etc. – Is mise,

RORY O’CALLAGHAN,

Kilmainham,

Dublin 8.

Sir, – Spare a thought for the Office of Public Works, which parachuted a giant soldier into St Stephen’s Green thinking no one would object. We were told, repeatedly, that it was not a celebration of British militarism. It was sold as a politically neutral act of remembrance. Well, since we’re at it, it’s worth recalling those plucky British soldiers firing on Irish rebels in St Stephen’s Green a century ago.

The Minister for Culture Josepha Madigan seems to have forgotten. She described the unscheduled paint job, which briefly made Tin Tommy appear to be wading through blood, as a “juvenile act”.

A hamfisted attempt to mould public opinion has failed. – Yours, etc,

AIDAN HARTE,

Donnybrook,

Dublin 4.