Trump not expected in Ireland during UK visit in July

US president will hold talks with Theresa May during controversial ‘working visit’

  British prime minister Theresa May during a meeting with  US president Donald Trump in New York last September. File photograph:  Brendan SmialowskiAFP/Getty Images

British prime minister Theresa May during a meeting with US president Donald Trump in New York last September. File photograph: Brendan SmialowskiAFP/Getty Images

 

Donald Trump will visit the UK on July 13th, it has been confirmed, though a visit to Ireland is not currently envisaged as part of the trip.

US officials said that there were no current plans for a visit to Ireland to be incorporated as part of the trip at this point. Taoiseach Leo Varadkar extended an invitation to the US president to visit Ireland when he held his first face-to-face meeting with Mr Trump in the Oval Office last month, prompting an expectation that a visit to Ireland could be incorporated as part of a UK trip.

The White House confirmed Mr Trump would visit Britain on July 13th, after attending a Nato summit in Brussels. Mr Trump had been due to visit earlier this year to open the new US embassy in London, but the trip was postponed.

The US president will hold bilateral talks with British prime minister Theresa May, but will not be given a state visit.

It is expected Mr Trump will travel to London directly from Brussels. The Nato summit is scheduled for July 11 and 12th in the Belgian capital.

Foreign secretary Boris Johnson welcomed the news on twitter. “FANTASTIC news that President @realdonaldtrump will at last come to Britain on 13 July. Looking forward to seeing our closest ally and friend on the GREATest visit ever.”

But there were critical voices. The Liberal Democrats’ deputy leader, Jo Swinson, said her party would protest against the visit. “It is our opportunity to stand in solidarity with all the people he has abused and denigrated,” she said. Her comments were echoed by Amnesty International UK’s director Kate Allen: “When Donald Trump arrives on these shores, we and thousands of our supporters will very definitely be making our voices heard.”

Mr Trump has publicly clashed with London mayor Sadiq Khan on Twitter over the London terrorist attacks. “At least seven dead and 48 wounded in terror attack and mayor of London says there is ‘no reason to be alarmed!’” Mr Trump tweeted, shortly after the attacks.

Mr Khan later said the invitation to Mr Trump for a state visit should be rescinded in light of the comments.

Responding to yesterday’s confirmation of Mr Trump’s visit Mr Khan tweeted: “If he comes to London, President Trump will experience an open and diverse city that has always chosen unity over division and hope over fear. He will also no doubt see that Londoners hold their liberal values of freedom of speech very dear.”