Irish Muslims condemn recognition of Jerusalem as Israeli capital

Muslims reject Trump acceptance of holy city as ‘the capital of Zionist occupying forces’

A Palestinian seeks cover during clashes at Huwwara checkpoint, near the West Bank City of Nablus. Clashes erupted after an announcement of a general strike and day of rage in protest at US president Donald  Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israeli capital. Photograph: EPA

A Palestinian seeks cover during clashes at Huwwara checkpoint, near the West Bank City of Nablus. Clashes erupted after an announcement of a general strike and day of rage in protest at US president Donald Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israeli capital. Photograph: EPA

 

Ireland’s Muslims have condemned in unequivocal terms the decision of US president Donald Trump to move the US embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

The Irish Muslim Board has said it “reject’s Mr Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of the Zionist occupying forces” in Israel. Chairman of the board Ali Selim said “such an ill-thought move represents a breach to international conventions and discredits the function of the United Nations. It also contradicts the role performed by the United States of America in the Palestinian-Israeli peace negotiations.”

On Wednesday President Trump made announced US recognition of Jerusalem as capital of Israel. The decision has been condemned internationally, with the EU and UN alarmed at its implications for peace in the Middle East.

US allies have also opposed what they see as Mr Trump’s reversal of decades of domestic and broad international policy on Jerusalem. The UN Security Council will meet on Friday at the request of eight states on the 15-member body to discuss Mr Trump’s decision.

‘Extremely concerned’

Dr Selim said the decision “invites more violence in the region and causes instability outside. It constitutes a clear violation to Muslims’ and Christians’ rights within the sight and hearing of the entire world.”

The board was “extremely concerned about this oppressive, reckless and unwarranted recognition and the serious repercussions it will cause for Palestine and the world”, he said.

The board appealed to “European governments in general and the Irish Government in particular to take swift action against it, condemn it, maintain their neutral international attitudes and contribute to put an impartial end to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict”.

The board was established about 18 months ago to encourage Muslims in Ireland to participate in politics so as to overcome what was perceived as a danger that the Muslim community might become marginalised in Irish society.

The board comprises 10 members, including two who are Irish born as well as two Pakistanis, two Syrians, two Libyans, one Somali, one Palestinian and one Egyptian. It meets monthly.