Plans for landmark Galway development reduced in size

Original Augustine Hill project consisted of 378 apartments and a six-screen cinema

Augustine Hill is a joint development by CIÉ, which owns the land, Edward Capital  and Summix Capital

Augustine Hill is a joint development by CIÉ, which owns the land, Edward Capital and Summix Capital

 

Plans for a landmark project for Galway have been reduced in size following consultation with the city council.

Augustine Hill beside Ceannt Station is an eight-acre development, and its developers say it is one of the biggest city centre projects in the State in recent years.

The project is currently before Galway City Council for planning approval.

Last year the promoters of a €320 million mixed use, urban regeneration development were told by the City Council to scale down the scheme significantly because of the threat it posed to “the unique character of the city”.

The original plan consisted of 378 apartments, a large commercial area, a 180-bed hotel, a covered public area and a six-screen cinema.

Augustine Hill is a joint development by CIÉ, which owns the land, Edward Capital, run by Galway developer Gerry Barrett, and Summix Capital. CIÉ held a competition in 2017 to find a developer for the site.

In response to a public consultation and feedback from Galway City Council, the total area of development has now been reduced by 11 per cent from 128,080sq m to 114,161sq m.

The original plan had 11 towers, the tallest of which is 21 storeys, making it the highest residential building in Ireland. It is being retained, but the number of other towers is being reduced from 10 to nine. The nine tower blocks have been reduced by either one or two storeys.

The quantity of public open space proposed has been increased by 3,544sqm, with increased activities and sculptures provided for within the open space areas throughout the development.

Residential

The overall residential element of the development has been increased by 7.5 per cent compared to the scheme as submitted with the planning application. The proportion of “build-to-rent” units has also decreased in favour of “build-to-sell” units.

Additionally, the number of “independent living” units for the elderly within the build-to-rent allocation has increased from 43 units proposed at application stage to 62 units now proposed.

When the development is completed it will consist of 11 new streets and four new public spaces in an area within five minutes’ walk of Eyre Square.

It is being described by its developer Gerry Barrett as a “one-of-a-kind place” as an “integrated district and central part of Galway with attractive cultural offers and leisure facilities, as well as innovative retail and entertainment concepts”.