Irish charity says one of its dogs died in Stockholm attack

Memorial set up for ‘Iggy’ who Dublin-based Dogs Aid sent to Sweden for adoption in 2012

Dublin rescue dog Iggy. “It is like winning the golden ticket to be adopted to Sweden for a dog and Iggy was very lucky and very loved.” Photograph: Facebook

Dublin rescue dog Iggy. “It is like winning the golden ticket to be adopted to Sweden for a dog and Iggy was very lucky and very loved.” Photograph: Facebook

 

An Irish animal charity says one of its dogs died in the recent terror attack in Sweden in which four people were killed.

Dublin-based Dogs Aid say its dog Iggy was adopted there in 2012. A memorial tribute, where Iggy took his last walk, is now full of flowers, candles and sweets.

Brenda Fitzpatrick of Dogs Aid said Iggy had been an unwanted “lurcher” who was brought to the Dogs Aid sanctuary at Meakstown Cottages in Dublin before he entered the Swedish adoption programme.

“It is like winning the golden ticket to be adopted to Sweden for a dog and Iggy was very lucky and very loved.”

She said he had been walking in the Stockholm’s restaurant and cafe district, which is very dog friendly, with his Swedish family, when the terrorist struck.

Four people were killed after a vehicle was driven into passersby outside a department store in the city on April 7th.

A spokeswoman for the Finglas-based charity confirmed on Wednesday that Iggy had been caught up in the terror attack.

Warm tributes were paid to Iggy on the Dogs Aid Facebook page by those who knew the dog.

Under a picture of Iggy the charity said: “We are deeply saddened to learn that one of our dogs was killed in the terrorist attack in Stockholm . . . R.I.P. beautiful, special boy.

“Run to the Bridge dear one, all of your Dogs Aid friends will be waiting for you.

“Our thoughts are with Iggy’s family. They loved him so much and gave him the best life imaginable.”

Gifts

Further tributes included a photograph of the memorial to Iggy in Sweden showing handmade cards bearing pencil sketches of the dog and messages of sympathy as well as gifts of flowers, dog treats and candles.

Another message said: “Your life was also important, it meant something to someone. Rest In Peace little one, it’s sad that you had to be exposed for someone’s hate. You are surrounded by love.”

Ms Fitzpatrick said the adoption programme had since evolved with dogs spending some time working with prisoners in Wheatfield Prison, before the dogs go forward for adoption in association with the Swedish rescue group which rehomes them.

The prison programme, called Wheatfield Animal Guardians (Wags) encourages emotional development among prison inmates through caring for an animal.

“Iggy did not do the prison part of the programme because that wasn’t developed then but we have three going out this Friday to Sweden and one of them, Gary, is a lurcher just like Iggy,” Ms Fitzpatrick said.

Dogs Aid is staffed by volunteers and entirely funded by public donations.