Six interiors trends that won't dump you next year

Black, green, earthy tones and natural materials are trends that will stick around

Spiced Honey is the colour for 2019

Spiced Honey is the colour for 2019

 

I’m not a big fan of following trends, but emerging themes from the interiors world this year appear to be more of an evolution than a fad and are worth paying attention to. Here are six ideas to embrace with confidence this season with the knowledge they will still be very much in vogue in years to come.

Earthy tones

Colour is one of my favourite subjects, and it has been fascinating to see how it has evolved over the past few years. This season is all about warmer, earthier tones and there isn’t a hint of grey in sight. From camel to caramel and tan to toffee, this season’s palette is about warmth, comfort and indulgence.

Each year a team of Dulux designers, architects, colour creatives and trend experts from the world of design get together to forecast the following year’s popular colour. And the colour for 2019 is Spiced Honey, a soft and amber-toned shade.

Marianne Shillingford, creative director of Dulux, says, “Like the classic camel coat, Spiced Honey’s versatility means it works as part of different colour palettes to achieve a variety of complete looks.”

Natural materials

Glass, marble, timber, wicker and cork all features strongly in homewares and furniture this season. It’s almost a backlash at plastic and a return to traditional crafts and the artisan.

Any move to sustainable materials is to be embraced. Furniture and homewares have a distinctly hand-made look. There is something effortlessly beautiful about this trend of natural wood, tactile textures and sculptural ceramics. By celebrating simplicity and imperfections, it’s a reminder to slow down and that good things take time.

Black is back
Black is back

Black

You could call the shift towards black the obliteration of grey. As a colour choice, it’s definite and bold, yet timeless and classic. Black is featuring in everything from furniture to building exteriors and is a particularly popular choice for windows. And the once popular black front door, which appears to have been overtaken by a multitude of greys? I predict a move back to black in the coming months.  

Dark wood floors

Pale timbers have dominated flooring for years. Everything from almost white to soft greys were the popular choice. Now, however, there is a move towards darker hues.

Oak is a popular and sustainable choice. It’s hard-wearing and versatile too. It can be smoked, stained and oiled to achieve almost any hue. Be ahead of the curve and opt for rich smoked nearly blackened charcoal tones or warmer espresso and chocolate hues.

Florals

Florals have been enjoying more attention in recent months. Botanical prints are featuring on everything from sofas and accessories to fabrics and wallpapers. I’m not suggesting a return to the Laura Ashley prints of the 1980s. This is a much bolder and more daring look. An edgy take on a very classic trend, it’s dark and moody and all about making a statement. To make the look work in your home, start by upholstering a chair or ottoman or even introducing some cushions. The trick to getting it right is to make sure you counterbalance the florals with one or two masculine features. Bring the whole look to life then with gorgeous fresh flowers.

A rub of the green
A rub of the green

Green

When I first started working as an architect in London in the late 1990s, I was told by a client never to use green in a room because it was unlucky. To say it baffled me was an understatement. Green is one of the most beautiful colours to work with for interiors, and it’s the easiest way to connect a space with the outdoors. Introduce some green accessories in your living space and you instantly link the room with the garden beyond.  

Sage and eucalyptus are excellent choices for an up-to-date take on this versatile shade. The beauty of green is that you can layer varying shades together to create a striking scheme, and combine different textures to add interest and contrast. Fresh greenery from foliage or plants add another dimension to this look.

Denise O'Connor is an architect and design consultant @optimisedesign

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