Derry Girls: Filming finally begins on third series, Lisa McGee confirms

Nicola Coughlan, Saoirse-Monica Jackson and the rest of the cast return for a final season

Derry Girls: Saoirse-Monica Jackson, Nicola Coughlan, Dylan Llewellyn, Louisa Harland and Jamie-Lee O’Donnell. Photograph: Peter Marley/Channel 4

Derry Girls: Saoirse-Monica Jackson, Nicola Coughlan, Dylan Llewellyn, Louisa Harland and Jamie-Lee O’Donnell. Photograph: Peter Marley/Channel 4

 

The third and final season of the hit TV series Derry Girls is starting filming in Northern Ireland, according to the comedy’s creator, Lisa McGee.

McGee said on Twitter today that the series is set as “the place they call home starts to change and Northern Ireland enters a new more hopeful phase – which was a small magical window of time”.

She added: “Derry Girls is a love letter to the place I come from and the people who shaped me. It has been an honour to write it and I will be forever proud of everything it’s achieved... We’re excited to start filming this series with our incredible cast and crew to hopefully take our loyal fans on one last adventure.”

The cast of Nicola Coughlan, Saoirse-Monica Jackson, Louisa Harland, Jamie-Lee O’Donnell and Dylan Llewellyn are all due to return, alongside Siobhán McSweeney, who plays Sr Michael, the group’s school principal.

According to Ian McElhinney, who plays Granda Joe in the Channel 4 comedy, filming should wrap up before Christmas, with an expected transmission date of spring 2022.

The third season was confirmed in April 2019, but filming was repeatedly delayed by the coronavirus pandemic.

McGee said in 2019 that the new episodes would be set in a more hopeful period for the group of friends, as their hometown marched towards peace and the Belfast Agreement of 1998.

“I have a political back story I want to do,” she told Radio Times. “It’s a bit scary but I’ll have to start writing things down soon. We’ll continue from ’95, so obviously it was very different for us then – for one thing all these splinter organisations came out of nowhere, which was quite strange, and then people were just getting used to peacetime.

“They had more to lose, I think, and we didn’t want it to go wrong, because it was something we all really wanted. It was something everyone was afraid to dream of, and then it was happening, so it’s scarier in a way, the idea of losing that.”

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.