Music books: A round-up of reads for literate listeners

Peter Frampton, Steven Hyden, Ronen Givony, Stephen Morris, Brian Eno and Jeff Tweedy

Thom Yorke, Phil Selway and Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead: Steven Hyden  pitches Kid A as “an overture for the chaos and confusion of the 21st century”. Photograph: Samir Hussein/Referns

Thom Yorke, Phil Selway and Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead: Steven Hyden pitches Kid A as “an overture for the chaos and confusion of the 21st century”. Photograph: Samir Hussein/Referns

Anyone with an interest in 1960s Britpop music will know the name of Peter Frampton. As a member of The Herd, he was selected by teen magazine Rave as “the face of ’68”, but pop stardom didn’t suit him. His scream-teen fanbase dropped him like a hot potato when he co-founded boogie-rock act, Humble Pie, but when Frampton left the group to go solo little did he realise that success would go from moderate to stratospheric. The full story is shared in Do You Feel Like I Do? – A Memoir by Peter Frampton, with Alan Light (Hachette Books, £22.99), and it reads like a dream come true, albeit with a sting in the tail.

Frampton was born in Beckenham, Kent. His father was head of the art department at Bromley Technical High School where, also attending three years ahead, was David Jones (soon to be Bowie). And so began a lifelong friendship that ran in parallel for decades.

The Irish Times
Please subscribe or sign in to continue reading.
The Irish Times

How can I keep reading?

You’ve reached an article that is only available to Irish Times subscribers.

Subscribe today and get the full picture for just €1 for the first month.

Subscribe No obligation, cancel any time.