Irish with UK bank accounts, warehouse shortages and airline refunds

Business Today: the best news, analysis and comment from The Irish Times business desk

A  Ryanair plane landing at Dublin airport with an Aer Lingus aircraft in the background. Passengers flying to and from the UK face an uncertain time after new Covid travel restrictions were imposed by the British Government.   Photograph: Niall Carson/PA Wire

A Ryanair plane landing at Dublin airport with an Aer Lingus aircraft in the background. Passengers flying to and from the UK face an uncertain time after new Covid travel restrictions were imposed by the British Government. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA Wire

 

Despite the imminent end of the Brexit transition period, customers of both Barclays Bank and Lloyds Banking Group based in the Republic will be able to keep their British accounts open with the UK lenders after end of the year. Fiona Reddan reports.

A shortage of warehouse space due to pre-Brexit stockpiling and storage during Christmas and the Covid-19 pandemic will worsen in January when Brexit kicks in, the industry has warned. Simon Carswell has the details.

Ryanair and Aer Lingus will refund passengers whose flights are banned under new restrictions imposed to contain a new Covid strain that has emerged in Britain, but not to all those who cancel their trips on services that do operate. Barry O’Halloran reports.

Consumer confidence is growing with 64 per cent of Irish people more willing to go to bricks-and-mortar shops than two weeks ago, according to research from accounting firm Deloitte But a large number of people are still wary of going on holiday abroad. Barry O’Halloran has the details.

Developer Emma Maye’s Ardale group has sold door lock and handle-maker Basta for an estimated ¤1 million, two years after rescuing it from examinership, writes Barry O’Halloran.

Some reasons to be cheerful, according to our columnist Chris Johns, who believes a new revolution in innovation is on the horizon, kickstarted by the pandemic.

Suggestions that only local authorities should be allowed to build social housing is nonsense, argues Pat Farrell, chief executie of Irish Institutional Property, which represents major private investors in the Irish real estate market.

In her weekly column, Pilita Clark wonders why some businesses been able to pivot successfully in the pandemic while others have failed to do so.

Stay up to date with all our business news: sign up to our business news alerts and our Business Today daily email news digest.