Tributes paid to former Ireland player Ambrose ‘Amby’ Fogarty

Dubliner enjoyed career in England and success in management at home

Ambrose Fogarty enjoyed a near 20-year reign as Athlone Town manager. Photograph: James Crombie/Inpho

Ambrose Fogarty enjoyed a near 20-year reign as Athlone Town manager. Photograph: James Crombie/Inpho

 

Former Republic of Ireland international Ambrose ‘Amby’ Fogarty has died at the age of 82.

A statement from the FAI confirmed that Fogarty passed away peacefully at University Hospital Limerick on Sunday evening.

Dublin-born Fogarty, who began his career with Home Farm, joined Sunderland in October 1957 and scored 44 goals in 144 appearances for the club.

He joined neighbours Hartlepool for a then club record fee of £10,000 in November 1963 and it was during his spell at the Victoria Ground that he collected the last of his 11 senior international caps.

He scored three goals for his country after making his international debut against West Germany.

Fogarty, a close friend of former Sunderland team-mate and Hartlepool manager Brian Clough, returned to Ireland in 1967 to become player-manager at Cork Hibernians and later Cork Celtic, and went on to manage Drumcondra and Galway United before a near-20-year reign at Athlone Town before retiring back to Wearside.

Former Athlone Town player Pauric Nicholson outlined Fogarty’s contribution to the midlands club in the FAI’s statement.

“He was the manager against AC Milan in 1975 – we were a struggling team until he came along. We’d signed Terry Daly and Eugene Davis then Amby came in. He transformed the club and had a lot of Brian Clough’s characteristics – the passion he had, he was so strong minded and fell out with a lot of people along the way because of his desire to get things done.

“Amby’s appointment as manager was the start of some great times for the club. He did play one game for us against Home Farm when we were up the top end of the table and I scored the equaliser with a late penalty. We beat Cork to finish runners-up that season and the next year we played AC Milan.”

FAI president Tony Fitzgerald paid tribute to the former international.

“Ambrose Fogarty had a great playing career and was the pioneer bringing in the likes of Alex Ludzic and players from the UK to the League of Ireland. He helped created a lot of interest for soccer in Cork and successfully managed both Cork Hibs and Cork Celtic,” said Fitzgerald.

“It is always a sad occasion to learn of the passing of a former international and we pass on our respects to his family and remember his contribution to Irish football with fondness.”

Fogarty is survived by his wife Brenda, and children Seán, Donal, Maura and Colette.

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