Brazil’s Caxirola, official World Cup instrument, is banned

Brazil’s answer to South Africa’s deafening vuvuzela - the symbol of 2010 World Cup

Brazil's caxirola, a bead filled plastic instrument, was meant to be the sound of the 2014 World Cup, but the colourful noisemaker has been banned from all stadiums,not because of the sound, rather its potential to injure if thrown. Video: Reuters

 

Brazil’s caxirola - a bead filled plastic instrument - was meant to be the sound of the 2014 World Cup, but the colourful noisemaker has been banned from all World Cup stadiums.

Created by popular musician Carlinhos Brown, the instrument was Brazil’s answer to South Africa’s infamous and deafening vuvuzela which became an unofficial symbol of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa. It was so loud that the plastic horn was subsequently banned from various sporting venues.

Despite being an official “mascot” of the 2014 World Cup, the caxirola was banned from World Cup venues, according to Brazil’s Globo, not because of the noise, but after a local soccer match in April was suspended when angry fans hurled the instruments on the pitch in protest over a referee’s decision.

FIFA bans the entry of fireworks, food and drink from outside the stadium outlets, megaphones, the famous vuvuzela, and flags and banners measuring over three square metres.

Despite the bans in stadiums, however, the caxirolas have already been manufactured and are being snapped up by fans visiting official FIFA shops and popular markets throughout Brazil.

Listen to the caxirola

“I don’t think they should ban the caxirola because it is a typical Brazilian instrument which fans want to take into the stadiums to cheer on their teams,” said Colombian fan Oscar Chaves, who has travelled to Rio de Janeiro for the tournament.

“It is like arriving and not being able to eat beans - like coming to Brazil and not being able to eat farofa or the typical foods,” said Mr Chaves´s girlfriend Luiza Ramirez.

A vendor in the popular market SAARA in the centre of Rio de Janeiro highlighted that not everyone would be watching the matches from within the stadiums, and that there has still been considerable demand for the caxirola.

“I think it is very sought after because people don’t want to watch the games inside the stadiums, they are going to watch them at home. So we are going to keep selling them, keep working,” said vendor Julio Cesar.

President Dilma Rousseff supported the project led by Brown, who quoted the government’s World Cup tag-line “all together in one rhythm” at the caxirola´s launch in Brasilia last April.

Whilst the caxirola will not be driving the rhythm within the stadiums, they are sure to be heard throughout Fan Fests and popular gatherings as the World Cup kicks off this Thursday June 12.

Reuters

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