Australia to allow 10,000 spectators at small stadiums

Rules would allow stadiums with capacities of up to 40,000 host up to 10,000 spectators

 AFL games are currently being held with no spectators due to the coronavirus outbreak. Photograph: EPA

AFL games are currently being held with no spectators due to the coronavirus outbreak. Photograph: EPA

 

Australia will allow crowds of up to 10,000 at small stadiums to watch sport as part of plans to ease social distancing restrictions in July, the country’s prime minister Scott Morrison said on Friday.

Morrison said Australia’s states were working toward rules which would let stadiums with capacities of up to 40,000 host up to 10,000 spectators.

He said the changes could also apply for concerts and festivals.

“It would have to be a large, open area. There would need to be seats at the appropriate distance,” he told reporters after a national cabinet meeting.

“It would need to be ticketed, so people would be able to understand who was in attendance at that event.”

Limits on mass gatherings are still in place in Australia and vary between states and territories. Australia has recorded more than 7,000 coronavirus infections and 102 deaths.

Australia’s two biggest professional winter sports, the National Rugby League (NRL) and Australian Football League (AFL), resumed their seasons with matches at closed stadiums but have been given the green light to allow small groups of fans to attend venues.

The NRL is allowing fans at corporate boxes on game-day, while South Australia state authorities approved a crowd of 2,000 in the terraces for the AFL match between the Adelaide Crows and Port Power at Adelaide Oval on Saturday.

Neighbouring New Zealand is expecting bumper crowds at stadiums this weekend to watch the first matches of “Super Rugby Aotearoa”, the world’s first professional rugby competition to resume since the coronavirus shutdown.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.