Billesdon Brook could be aimed at Irish 1,000 Guineas

Hannon’s 66-1 heroine would be fourth horse to complete Newmarket-Curragh double

 Sean Levey and Billesdon Brook en-route to Newmarket success. Photograph: Alan Crowhurst/Getty

Sean Levey and Billesdon Brook en-route to Newmarket success. Photograph: Alan Crowhurst/Getty

 

Sunday’s shock 66-1 Newmarket 1,000 Guineas winner Billesdon Brook could attempt a classic double at the Curragh later this month.

Trainer Richard Hannon has confirmed a tilt at the Tattersalls Irish 1,000 Guineas is being considered for a filly who became the longest priced winner ever of the English version.

“She was very impressive in the last furlong as she really appreciated that trip,” Hannon said. “We will need to come up with a plan now. Obviously Ireland and Ascot (Coronation Stakes) are very high on the list.”

Billesdon Brook doesn’t hold an Irish Guineas entry and would need to be added to the race if she is to become just the fourth filly to bring off the Newmarket-Curragh double.

Attraction in 2004 was the first and was followed by Finsceal Beo (2007) and Winter a year ago.

Billesdon Brook has been ridden in all but two of her ten career starts by Sean Levey, a former apprentice at Aidan O’Brien’s Ballydoyle yard, who guided her to success at Newmarket.

Tuesday’s Irish action is Roscommon’s mixed card where Bianca Minola makes a quick reappearance in the mile and a half handicap.

The four year old carries a 6lb penalty for winning over ten furlongs at Cork on Saturday and the expected testing conditions shouldn’t be an issue.

Future Proof won his debut in good style at Leopardstown and faces a stiff test against the 98 rated Burgundy Boy in the Roscommon opener. It’s a test he can pass while Willie Mullins can double up in the jumps code with Small Farm and Screaming Rose.

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