Tyson Fury: ‘I just wanted to die so bad, I gave up on life’

Heavyweight champion discusses his battle with depression on Joe Rogan podcast

Tyson Fury fights Deontay Wilder for the WBC heavyweight championship on December 1st. Photograph: John McCoy/Getty

Tyson Fury fights Deontay Wilder for the WBC heavyweight championship on December 1st. Photograph: John McCoy/Getty

 

Tyson Fury has opened up about his battle with depression and said he “wanted to die so bad” while suffering with the mental illness.

Fury, 30, who fights America’s WBC heavyweight champion Deontay Wilder on December 1st, also talked about his alcoholism and drug addiction in a candid interview.

“I would start thinking these crazy thoughts,” Tyson told video podcast The Joe Rogan Experience. “I bought a brand new Ferrari convertible in the summer of 2016.

“I was in it on the highway and at the bottom, I got the car up to 190mph and heading towards a bridge.

“I didn’t care about nothing. I just wanted to die so bad. I gave up on life, but as I was heading to the bridge I heard a voice saying, ‘No, don’t do this Tyson, think about your kids, your family, your sons and daughter growing up without a dad.”’

Tyson discussed how his life spiralled out of control in 2015 after he defeated Wladimir Klitschko in Dusseldorf to become WBA, IBF and WBO heavyweight champion.

“I’d wake up and think, ‘Why did I wake up this morning?’ he said. ”And this is coming from a man who won everything. Money, fame, glory, titles, a wife, family and kids — everything.”

Tyson said he visited a psychiatrist but was only able to mount his latest challenge for the heavyweight title due to his faith in God.

“I was out at Halloween in 2017 dressed as a skeleton, but I was 29 and everyone was younger and I thought, ‘is this what I want from my life?’ he said.

“I left early and went home into a dark room, took the skeleton suit off and I prayed to God to help me. I’d never begged to God to help me. I could feel tears running down my face.

“I almost accepted that being an alcoholic was my fate but after praying for 10 minutes, I got up and felt the weight was lifted off my shoulders.

“For the first time in my life I thought I was going to be OK. I knew I couldn’t do it on my own.”

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.