Conor McGregor in rich company on Forbes’ Top 100 list

Irish UFC fighter made most of €20m from three bouts against Diaz, Aldo and Mendes

Conor McGregor of Ireland reacts to his victory over Jose Aldo of Brazil in their UFC featherweight championship bout during the UFC 194 event inside MGM Grand Garden Arena last December. Photograph: Getty Images

Conor McGregor of Ireland reacts to his victory over Jose Aldo of Brazil in their UFC featherweight championship bout during the UFC 194 event inside MGM Grand Garden Arena last December. Photograph: Getty Images

 

Conor McGregor is in rich company alongside the likes of Floyd Mayweather and Cristiano Ronaldo in Forbes’ Top 100 Highest Paid Athletes for 2016.

Unlike last year when no MMA fighters were included, McGregor comes in at number 85 with his earnings estimated at $22 million ( €19.4m), having pocketed $18 million from his three bouts against Nate Diaz, Jose Aldo and Chad Mendes. While also raking in $4 million in endorsements with “Reebok, Fanatics, Monster Energy, BSN, Bud Light, Rolls Royce and Electronic Arts”.

Topping the list is Real Madrid and Portugal soccer player Cristiano Ronaldo ($88m), followed by Barcelona’s Ballon d’Or Lionel Messi ($81.4m), and NBA basketballer LeBron James ($77.2m).

The featherweight champion, who faces Diaz in a welterweight rematch at UFC 202 in August, is the first UFC male representative in a number of years - Ronda Rousey did make the top 10 for women’s athletes in 2015, but fell short of the top 100 overall.

McGregor is joined by three boxers; Floyd Mayweather is ranked at 16th ($44m), Manny Pacquiao is at 63 ($24m), and Canelo Alvarez is at 92 ($21.5m).

Despite McGregor having considerably larger pay-per-view events than all three combined - they all managed to take home significantly more from their bouts than McGregor due to the financial model of the UFC.

Irish golfer Rory McIlroy also makes the list, in at 17th and earning a total of $42.6m. Still the highest earning sports man on the island of Ireland.

For the full list click here.

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