Brendan Taylor reveals drugs-related spot-fixing blackmail

Former Zimbabwe skipper set to be punished for failing to report the illegal approach

Brendan Taylor, pictured batting here against Ireland, has admitted failing to report an illegal spot-fixing approach.  Photograph: Inpho

Brendan Taylor, pictured batting here against Ireland, has admitted failing to report an illegal spot-fixing approach. Photograph: Inpho

 

Former Zimbabwe captain Brendan Taylor says he will be hit with a multi-year ban over his delayed reporting of a spot-fixing plot.

The 35-year-old wicketkeeper-batter says he was blackmailed to engage in spot-fixing by a group of Indian businessmen he met in October 2019, after they took photographs of him taking cocaine.

Taylor says he did not spot-fix, but admits he did not report the incident to the International Cricket Council (ICC) for four months, which he accepts was “too long a time”.

He also wrote on Twitter that he will be checking into a rehabilitation centre to tackle his substance abuse issues from Tuesday.

“I would like to place on record that I have never been involved in any form of match-fixing. I may be many things but I am not a cheat,” the former Nottinghamshire player wrote.

“My love for the beautiful game of cricket far outweighs and surpasses any threats which could be thrown my way.

“As a result of approaching the ICC I attended multiple interviews and engagements and was as honest and transparent as I could be during their investigations.

“Inside and outside I was beating myself up and I still wish I had sought support and advice earlier for a multitude of reasons.

“That being said, the ICC are taking the decision to impose a multi-year ban on my international cricketing career. I humbly accept this decision and only hope that my story will be used as a means of encouragement for cricketers to report any approaches early.”

The ICC is yet to confirm a sanction for Taylor.

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