Angling Notes: ‘Brown tag’ regulations on River Lee to boost conservation efforts

Anglers who wish to catch and keep wild salmon must vie for 152 tags through online lotteries

To boost conservation efforts on the Lower River Lee in Cork, the total amount of Atlantic salmon available for ‘harvesting’ by anglers is 152 fish for the 2022 season.

To boost conservation efforts on the Lower River Lee in Cork, the total amount of Atlantic salmon available for ‘harvesting’ by anglers is 152 fish for the 2022 season.

 

To boost conservation efforts, anglers who wish to catch and keep wild salmon from the Lower River Lee in Cork this year, are being advised that ‘brown tag’ regulations will come into force from Tuesday, February 1st 2022.

The measures are included in the Wild Salmon and Sea Trout Tagging Scheme (Amendment) Regulations, recently signed into law by the Minister for the Environment, Climate and Communications, Eamon Ryan.

Under brown tag regulations, an angler who wishes to ‘harvest’ a wild salmon i.e., take or keep it, must attach a brown tag as well as a standard blue tag to the fish. To help conserve stocks, 152 brown tags will be available for the season and will be distributed to anglers with a 2022 rod licence through a series of online lotteries.

Up to a quarter of the available number of brown tags can be issued at one time, therefore, 38 brown tags will be selected through the first online lottery on January 31st 2022.

Anglers interested in entering the January 31st draw are being asked to email their request to: 2022corkleebrowntag@fisheriesireland.ie between Friday, January 21st and Friday, January 28th 2022 only.

Within this email, anglers must provide their name, contact address, telephone number and also quote their 2022 salmon licence number. Only one entry is permitted per licence holder.

Those anglers not allocated a brown tag are only permitted to fish for salmon on a ‘catch and release’ basis on the Lower River Lee, where the salmon is returned safely to the same waterbody.

Further details are available at: www.fisheriesireland.ie or Macroom office on (026) 41221.

The brown tag regulations come into force on the Lower River Lee in Cork from February 1st and remain in place until midnight on September 30th 2022.

Mostly quiet on salmon and sea trout fisheries

A round-up of a selection of salmon and sea trout fisheries that are open around the country as of last Thursday (Jan 20th) revealed just the one fish caught by Garrett Byrne on the Drowes on Thursday (Jan 13th).

On Lough Currane in Waterville, Co Kerry, top ghillie Neil O’Shea said only a handful of boats ventured out since opening day last Monday. Apart from a number of kelts caught, there was no fresh fish to report.

It was a similar story on the Killarney lakes and Shane Gallagher, proprietor of the Drowes Fishery in Donegal, said a few sightings of fish were observed and although conditions were ideal, angling activity was quiet.

Lifeguards required for Northern Ireland beaches

The RNLI has launched its search for budding new lifeguards to start their career on some of Northern Ireland’s most popular beaches, as applications are open for 2022.

Lifeguards are needed for beaches at Benone, Downhill, Castlerock, Portstewart, Portrush West, Portrush East, Whiterocks and Ballycastle on the Causeway Coast and Tyrella, Murlough and Cranfield in County Down.

Successful applicants will receive world-class lifesaving training, enjoy good rates of pay and develop valuable skills for a future career.

Karl O’Neill, lifeguard supervisor, said: “Lifeguarding is a really unique and rewarding role. You can gain invaluable skills and training whilst working on the beach and being part of an incredible team.”

Find out more about how you can help to improve the safety of a community and apply to be part of the lifesaving team at: rnli.org/BeALifeguard.

*If you have an angling story to share, please send to me at angling@irishtimes.com.

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