North and South

 

Sir, – I dispute Kenneth Harper’s suggestion that people in Donegal refer to a trip to Derry as a “journey to the North” (Letters, February 26th). Anyone I know simply calls it a trip to Derry which is, of course, our local city. If there is any confusion about directions up here, it is in relation to Dublin. I go “to Dublin” or, at a pinch “down to Dublin” whereas lots of people choose to go “up to Dublin”. The one thing we share about the journey is that, up or down, it won’t be by train – there isn’t one. – Yours, etc,

KEVIN O’SULLIVAN,

Letterkenny,

Co Donegal.

A chara, – When abroad, and asked whether I’m from the North or the South of Ireland, I truthfully reply that I’m from the East of Ireland. – Is mise,

SEAN O’CUINN,

An Charraig Dhubh,

Co Átha Cliath.

Sir, – It is interesting to note that for many on this island the most northerly point of land is in the South. – Yours, etc,

PAT MULLEN,

Dundalk,

Co Louth.

Sir, – Sinn Féin is not alone in having trouble remembering place names. The Irish Times continuously refers to somewhere called the State. It must be important because it begins with a capital letter. Is it anywhere near Ireland, do you think? – Yours, etc,

KIERAN FAGAN,

Killiney,

Co Dublin.