Kathy Sheridan: Eoghan Harris’s defence doesn’t stack up

There is a distinction between robust commentary and vitriolic abuse

Eoghan Harris’s complaint of being deprived of platforms was  predictable and  nonsensically incongruous. File photograph: Bryan O’Brien

Eoghan Harris’s complaint of being deprived of platforms was predictable and nonsensically incongruous. File photograph: Bryan O’Brien

No regular follower of Eoghan Harris would have been surprised by his RTÉ interview with Sarah McInerney. Certainly not by the line about a “ban” by RTÉ or being deprived of platforms. The complaint was as predictable as the sheer nonsensical incongruity of it.

Across the decades at pivotal times in national discourse, Eoghan Harris was the serial alpha male presence on the most highly rated shows of powerful platforms, mainly due to his media-policy adviser-advocacy role to various political parties and candidates. In print he not only commanded priceless space and freedom to express his views in Ireland’s top-selling Sunday broadsheet but shaped vital aspects of that paper’s agenda. What he did with all that power and exposure is another column entirely.

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