Main points of DUP deal with the Conservatives

Agreement states DUP has ‘no involvement’ in Government’s political talks in North

Britain’s  prime minister Theresa May (right) stands next to Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) leader Arlene Foster (left), as DUP MP Jeffrey Donaldson (second left) sits and signs paperwork with Britain’s parliamentary secretary to the Treasury, and chief whip, Gavin Williamson, whilst posing for a photograph inside 10 Downing Street on Monday. Photograph: Reuters

Britain’s prime minister Theresa May (right) stands next to Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) leader Arlene Foster (left), as DUP MP Jeffrey Donaldson (second left) sits and signs paperwork with Britain’s parliamentary secretary to the Treasury, and chief whip, Gavin Williamson, whilst posing for a photograph inside 10 Downing Street on Monday. Photograph: Reuters

 

The DUP has agreed a confidence and supply deal to support the Conservative minority government in Britain.

Here are the key parts of the deal:

Agreement between DUP and the Conservatives

  • There will be no change to the triple-lock on pensions. The Conservatives had set out plans in their manifesto to down-grade the protection to a double-lock.
  • Tory plans to introduce means-testing for the winter fuel allowance in most of the UK have been dropped.
  • An extra £1 billion in funding will go to Northern Ireland, mainly over the next two years
  • The Nato commitment to spend at least 2 per cent of national income on defence will be met.
  • Both parties have committed to implementing the Armed Forces Covenant “throughout the United Kingdom”. The DUP has previously claimed the covenant has not been fully implemented in Northern Ireland.
  • The deal says the Conservative party will “never be neutral in expressing its support” for the Union but will “govern in the interests of all parts of the community” in Northern Ireland.
  • The DUP will have “no involvement” in the Government’s political talks in Northern Ireland and “recognises the need for early restoration of inclusive and stable” devolved government.
  • The agreement covers the length of the Parliament but will be reviewed after each session.

This is how the additional funding allocated to Northern Ireland breaks down:

  • £400 million for infrastructure projects (£200 million per year for two years)
  • £200 million for improvement of health service (£100 million per year for two years)
  • £150 million for ultra-fast broadband (£75 million per year for two years)
  • £100 million for tackling deprivation (£20 million per year for five years)
  • £100 million to address immediate pressures in health and education (£50 million per year for two years)
  • £50 million for mental health services (£10 million per year for five years).

PA