Draft Brexit resolution likely to get strong backing from MEPs

Resolution insists UK must keep to commitments to ensure there is no harder border

Brian Hayes: “The parliament’s call for an ‘association agreement’ could serve as the basis for a possible solution for the future relationship with the UK”

Brian Hayes: “The parliament’s call for an ‘association agreement’ could serve as the basis for a possible solution for the future relationship with the UK”

 

A draft Brexit resolution likely to get strong backing from MEPs next week will give unequivocal support to the Northern Ireland protocol of the draft EU Withdrawal Agreement, specifically its soft border provisions.

It insists that “the UK must keep to its commitments to ensure that there is no hardening of the Border on the island of Ireland, either by means of detailed proposals to be put forward in negotiations on the framework of the future EU-UK relationship, by specific solutions for Northern Ireland or by continued regulatory alignment with the EU acquis”.

And it calls for the continued UK funding support for the North’s EU peace programme.

On trade and the future relationship between the EU and UK, the motion “considers the current UK position only compatible with a trade agreement that could form the trade and economic pillar of an association agreement”.

And it notes that under such an agreement market access for services is limited and always subject to exclusions, reservations and exceptions.

“Leaving the single market would lead to the UK losing passporting for financial services and the possibility to open branches in the EU subject to UK supervision,” it says.

Dublin MEP Brian Hayes, welcoming the text, said that “by advocating for a deep and comprehensive trade agreement Ireland’s interests are strongly defended in the text, with a clear signal that there should be no hardening of the Border”.

“The parliament’s call for an ‘association agreement’ could serve as the basis for a possible solution for the future relationship with the UK. This could allow for reciprocal market access for both goods and services.”