Adams again insists he had no involvement in killing of Jean McConville

Sinn Féin leader challenged by Kenny and Martin in Dáil

Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams: said Fianna Fáil was fighting a battle for survival and that was their only concern in raising issues. Photograph: Bryan O’Brien

Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams: said Fianna Fáil was fighting a battle for survival and that was their only concern in raising issues. Photograph: Bryan O’Brien

 


Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams has again insisted he had no involvement in the 1972 killing of Jean McConville, the Catholic mother-of-10 whose body was found in a beach in Co Louth in 2003.

“I have consistently rejected claims that I had any knowledge of, or any part in, the abduction or killing of Jean McConville,’’ he said.

The US appeals court has ruled that only interviews dealing directly with her murder could be turned over by Boston College to the PSNI.

The Sinn Féin leader was responding in the Dáil to Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin and Taoiseach Enda Kenny, as Mr Kenny answered questions about his recent visit to Boston.


‘Voices from the Grave’
Mr Martin said it was a great pity there had not been a resolution to Ms McConville’s killing. The book, Voices from the Grave, had outlined that Brendan Hughes, a key member of the Belfast brigade of the IRA at the time, had pulled no punches in his claims about who ordered the killing. Mr Hughes had made clear his views on the claims by the Sinn Féin leader of having had no involvement in the IRA.

Mr Martin said Mr Adams should make a statement on the matter, adding that if the same allegations were made against any other member of the House there would be clarion calls for him or her to confirm the veracity or otherwise of blunt allegations.

‘Sordid tale’
“It is a very sordid tale and I am surprised the Taoiseach did not have any discussion on the matter during his trip to the United States, ” Mr Martin said.

Mr Kenny said there was no disagreement between Mr Martin and himself on the issues. It was a short visit with a tight schedule.

He added that he had read Voices from the Grave and the section concerning Ms McConville was stark and strong. “When Deputy Adams comments, he may well make the statement that he has made to me before.’’

Mr Adams said his denial of any involvement in Ms McConville’s killing was not the end of the matter, because Fianna Fáil and its current leader were fighting a battle for survival and that was their only concern in raising issues.

He added that Mr Martin had said to the Taoiseach last week that Mr Kenny had chosen to exploit the past and not to learn from it. “And he should practice what he preaches.’’