Decision on EU aid required is for Ireland itself, says Rehn

EU Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs gives view after meeting Noonan

Olli Rehn, economic and monetary affairs commissioner for the European Union, has  acknowledged “the significant progress that Ireland has made over the course of the adjustment programme and that Ireland is now in a strong position to exit the programme this year”.  Photograph: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

Olli Rehn, economic and monetary affairs commissioner for the European Union, has acknowledged “the significant progress that Ireland has made over the course of the adjustment programme and that Ireland is now in a strong position to exit the programme this year”. Photograph: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

 

The decision about the amount of help Ireland will need from the EU and its partner lenders to Ireland is “ultimately” one for Ireland itself, EU Commissioner Ollie Rehn said tonight.

The EU Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs was speaking after a meeting with Minister for Finance Michael Noonan at the European Parliament in Strasbourg.

At the meeting, Mr Noonan briefed Mr Rehn on the adjustment programme and issues related to the forthcoming programme exit.

Mr Noonan explained the recent budget and in particular Ireland’s plans to reduce the deficit below to 4.8 per cent in 2014, within the 5.1 per cent EDP target. He also said Ireland planned to deliver a primary balance or small surplus in 2014.

In a short statement after the meeting, Mr Rehn acknowledged “the significant progress that Ireland has made over the course of the adjustment programme and that Ireland is now in a strong position to exit the programme this year”.

He said : “Ultimately, the final decision on post-programme options is one for the Irish authorities.”