Vaelo looks for buyout loan; data regulation top location factor; and the case for a worst CEO list

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Helen Dixon, the Data Protection Commissioner. Nine out of 10 business are looking to the DPC to issue guidelines on the collection of data about workers’ vaccination status

Helen Dixon, the Data Protection Commissioner. Nine out of 10 business are looking to the DPC to issue guidelines on the collection of data about workers’ vaccination status

 

Data regulation has replaced tax as the most important factor for many businesses when deciding where to invest, a new global survey from William Fry claims. The report indicates that investors’ priorities have changed since the solicitors completed a similar study in 2016. The law firm found that the regulatory regime is the most important driver for businesses seeking to make data-related investments in the EU. Barry O’Halloran has the details.

Barry also reports that Jacob’s Biscuits and Batchelors’ Peas owner Valeo Foods plans to borrow around €1.2 billion to fund a buyout of the business from current shareholder Capvest for €1.7 billion, according to reports at the weekend.

While there are regular lists lauding the world’s top CEOs, the latest one coming last week courtesy of Glassdoor, it might also be good to have a reliable list of the worst CEOs, writes Pilita Clark. In her column, she argues that would that offer a more useful guide for potential employees, customers and investors, especially when it comes to smaller, less scrutinised companies?

Nine out of 10 Irish business is looking to the Data Protection Commission to issue guidelines on the collection of data about workers’ vaccination status. The calls come as 94 per cent of businesses say they have no employee vaccination strategy in place. And the majority say they have no intention of putting one in place. Dominic Coyle has the details.

In his column this week, Eoin-Burke Kennedy writes that house prices can go down, as well as up, and while there’s currently a demand bubble in Irish housing market – one that’s likely to persist for several months, it won’t last.

Successive governments have loudly proclaimed their commitment to the creation of a knowledge economy and the high levels of R&D investment required to sustain it. Unfortunately,writes Graham Love of Mazars, the reality speaks louder than the rhetoric and Ireland languishes near the foot of the European league table when it comes to R&D expenditure.

Revenues at the four star Gresham hotel on Dublin’s O’Connell Street fell by 73.5 per cent last year due to the pandemic. Gordon Deegan reports the hotel’s revenues decreased from €21.19 million in 2019 to €5.6 million last year.

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