Dublin Airport to get new €320 million runway by 2020

New runway to be built 1.6km north of the current main runway

DAA is to push ahead with plans for a new runway at Dublin Airport, in a bid to ensure further growth at the airport.

DAA is to push ahead with plans for a new runway at Dublin Airport, in a bid to ensure further growth at the airport.

 

DAA is to push ahead with plans for a new runway at Dublin Airport, in a bid to ensure further growth at the airport.

Permission for the new runway, which will be built 1.6km north of the current main runway, was originally granted in 2007 with 31 conditions attached. The economic downturn and the subsequent fall in passengers coming through the airport saw the plans put on hold.

Passenger numbers at the airport have grown in the past two years.

The new runway is expected to be completed by 2020, and it will cost around €320 million.

However, the airport authority warned that two of the conditions attached to the planning permission were “onerous” and would severely reduce the future operational capacity of the airport at key times.

“Last year was the busiest year ever in the airport’s history with a record 25 million passengers travelling in 2015. Passenger numbers continue to grow strongly in 2016 with double digit growth recorded in the first two months of this year,” said DAA chief executive Kevin Toland.

Runway

“We are progressing our plans to deliver the new runway in accordance with the development and pathway for growth outlined in the Government’s National Aviation Policy (NAP). Dublin Airport’s North Runway will significantly improve Ireland’s connectivity supporting trade, foreign direct investment and tourism.”

Dublin Airport has added almost 50 new routes and services in the past two years, with nine new airlines operating from the airport. The new runway could open up new services to Asia and Africa, the airport authority said. DAA announced on Tuesday it would increase its aviation fuel storage capacity six fold to meet the growing demand.

“Driven by demand from airlines and passengers, Dublin Airport’s current runway infrastructure is at capacity during the peak hours and this must be addressed to enable future growth. The north runway will significantly improve Ireland’s connectivity which plays a critical role in growing passenger numbers and sustaining the future economic development of Ireland,” said Mr Toland.

If it meets DAA’s projections, it has the potential to support more than 30,000 jobs over the next 20 years.

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport, Paschal Donohoe, said the runway project was a vital piece of infrastructure.

“This project is of major strategic importance to Ireland as an island economy, in terms of improved connectivity. It has the potential to create thousands of jobs, both directly and indirectly, over the coming years,” he said.

Chambers Ireland welcomed the announcement, saying expanding the capacity at Dublin Airport will increase international connectivity, grow access to external markets for Irish business and bolster the country’s ability to attract Foreign Direct Investment.

“This is a vital piece of national infrastructure that will support the continued growth of Ireland’s economy. Ireland is fundamentally a trading economy, and as an island nation, we must strive to ensure that we have the international air connectivity necessary to allow our businesses to grow and create jobs,” Ian Talbot, chief executive of Chambers Ireland said.

But Dublin Chamber said a long term strategy was needed to make sure that the impact of this growth at Dublin Airport does not become solely a regional gain. “Dublin Airport has become a critical piece of Ireland’s economy and the capacity gained by the second runway means we can ‘land’ more businesses and tourists across the country,” said Gina Quin,Dublin Chamber chief executive.

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