Intel has Irish inside for its new wearable tech

Button-sized Curie module designed in Ireland shines alongside Lady Gaga at CES presentation

 Professional free runner Jason Paul performs a twisting jump off an obstacle while Intel technology records data in real time. The low-cost, low-energy Curie module is at the heart of Intel’s wearable strategy.

Professional free runner Jason Paul performs a twisting jump off an obstacle while Intel technology records data in real time. The low-cost, low-energy Curie module is at the heart of Intel’s wearable strategy.

 

Intel teamed up with big names such as Lady Gaga for its CES address, but the real star of the technology giant’s show was an Irish-designed computer the size of button.

The low-cost, low-energy Curie module is at the heart of Intel’s wearable strategy, and as the group’s chief executive Brian Krzanich demonstrated on stage, it has the flexibility and potential to be used in a number of different industries.

The Intel chief watched on as BMX riders, equipped with two Curie sensors, performed around - and above - him. On the screen, their statistics were displayed for the audience, from height and spin to acceleration, all in real time.

But the technology isn’t just a concept. Intel has already done a deal that will see it feature in the upcoming X Games.

“This new era begins in just a few weeks,” Mr Krznich said.

Intel, which has encountered increased competition in the chip industry as mobile devices and wearable technology have become more popular, was also keen to show off its progress in the drone sector. A smarter drone with the company’s RealSense camera, an Intel CPU and advanced collision avoidance technology was demonstrated on stage, avoiding trees and other obstacles as it followed and filmed a bike rider.

Eyewear

Intel has also teamed up with Oakley to develop smart eyewear that doubles as a fitness trainer, called Radar Pace. Ironman champion Craig Alexander was drafted to help demonstrate the glasses.

“The challenge with data is that it requires interpretation to be meaningful,” he said. “I need to know what that data means and how to respond to it in the moment.”

And that wasn’t all. The company has been working on a smart helmet that uses computer enhanced vision and augmented reality to identify and fix problems with machinery. It also has deals with New Balance, ESPN and Red Bull Media House.

And there was a multi-year partnership with the Recording Academy to bring technological innovation to the Grammys, as apart of the “Next Generation of Grammy Moments” initiative. The first artist to get the Intel treatment will be Lady Gaga.