Fidelity Investments Ireland to add 90 new jobs to its workforce

Up to 60 of computer engineer positions will be in Galway with remaining 30 in Dublin

Fidelity Investments general manager Al Riviezzo. The company  provides fintech solutions and innovations to the wider global firm. Photograph: Shane O’Neill/SON Photographic

Fidelity Investments general manager Al Riviezzo. The company provides fintech solutions and innovations to the wider global firm. Photograph: Shane O’Neill/SON Photographic

 

Fidelity Investments Ireland is to add 90 new jobs to its workforce, expanding its technology team based here.

Up to 60 of the jobs will be in Galway, with the remaining 30 in Dublin. The US investment giant is seeking to hire Java engineers, along with full-stack, front-end, quality and data engineers.

Fidelity Investments Ireland provides fintech solutions and innovations to the wider global firm.

The Boston-headquartered financial services company said recruitment is under way and it is expected that the new jobs will be filled in the first half of 2021. The recruitment drive is being driven by customer demand.

“We continue as a firm to experience significant growth,” said Al Riviezzo, general manager of Fidelity Investments Ireland. “We are seeing record levels of new accounts being opened, assets being transferred to the firm, and trading activity among our clients both new and existing, and it’s prompting us to hire in many areas.”

Diversity

The new jobs come less than a year after Fidelity announced that it planned to hire 100 people, mainly based in Dublin. Mr Riviezzo said the company exceeded that target, adding 170 staff, despite the pandemic.

“That’s another reason why, as the firm needs to grow, we looked to Ireland – it has worked for us before. The skills, the experience, the diversity, and our ability attract them,” he said.

With Fidelity’s Irish staff currently working from home, new recruits will be working remotely until the pandemic has ended. The company is using a virtual process to interview and train new employees, in line with Government restrictions to slow the spread of Covid-19. That includes a “new hire” buddy system and remote tech services. Mr Riviezzo said the company was looking at a hybrid model of working when the pandemic ended and restrictions were lifted.

“We’re trying to push the bounds for what we call the future of work,” he said. “We’ve totally embraced that work as we know it has totally changed in a post-Covid environment. We’re fully embracing what I think is being referred to as a hybrid model, where the majority of our associates will spend no more than 50 per cent of their time in an office environment in a post-Covid world.”

Fidelity is celebrating its 25th anniversary in Ireland, but it is only in the past decade that it has seen significant growth here. In 2013, the company employed 400 people – it now employs 1,300. A major shift came in 2015 and 2016, when it added another 300 staff with the opening of a new division.