Dublin Web Summit now among the events of the year

Event calculated to be worth €24m to local economy

Dublin Web Summit founder  Paddy Cosgrave:  aims to send  400-plus international journalists  at the summit  home with  a taste for Irish food

Dublin Web Summit founder Paddy Cosgrave: aims to send 400-plus international journalists at the summit home with a taste for Irish food

 

Few tech events have made as big an impact in such a short space of time as the Dublin Web Summit.

Founded just three years ago from the bedroom of Paddy Cosgrave (above), the first event in 2010 had no backers and few believers. Fewer than 30 people spoke at the conference, there was only one workshop and just three start-ups exhibited. The wifi broke and the audio-visual didn’t work. And there wasn’t a bite of food to be had.

This year an estimated 10,000 people from 100 countries will attend the summit including more than 350 speakers.

Some of the biggest names in tech, including Elon Musk, Dropbox co-founder Drew Houston, AOL chief executive Tim Armstrong and Evernote boss Phil Libin, will be in attendance.

In short, the event is a massive coup for Ireland and its organisers, calculated to be worth €24 million to the local economy. Ireland has made a good job of building a proto-Silicon Valley in recent years, with the Government hoping to position Dublin as the tech capital of Europe.

Events such as this bring us one step closer, helping to strengthen Ireland as a hub of technology, while showcasing not just our talents in IT and entrepreneurship but sectors such as food, too.

This week’s web summit won’t be just about tech, with Cosgrave also opting to show off Ireland’s talent for good food.

As well as a tech hub, he says Ireland should be the world’s food capital, with no other country producing more food per capita. Cosgrave aims to send the 400-plus international journalists travelling to the event home with not just knowledge of tech but a taste for Irish food.

Over the two days of the summit, attendees will be treated to 400,000 tastings, with food from Irish chefs, bakers, farmers, cheese-makers and fishermen, as well as beverages from artisan craft brewers and juice-makers.

The web summit may not have been part of the Gathering, but in terms of showcasing Ireland on the world stage, it could potentially be the best business event of the year.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.