Wolf of Wall Street preys on Irish sheep

 Jordan Belfort during his talk  at the RDS to a crowd of just under 3,000. Photograph: Cyril Byrne

Jordan Belfort during his talk at the RDS to a crowd of just under 3,000. Photograph: Cyril Byrne

 

Considering the fact that financial sharp practice is a national sport in this country, is it really any wonder that such a welcome was afforded this week for Jordan Belfort, the real-life Wolf of Wall Street upon whom the Leonardo di Caprio movie was based?

Belfort was collared by US authorities during the 1990s for a stock fraud that cost investors $200 million (€147 million) and served 22 months in prison.

More than 2,500 ridiculously enthusiastic locals, paying at least €80 each, crammed into the RDS in Dublin on Tuesday evening for the high-octane presentation by the crook-turned-motivational speaker.

According to one curious attendee, most of the crowd seemed rather, well, up for it. There is absolutely no truth to the rumour that a few rogues among them left a trail of white powder down Merrion Road afterwards.

Belfort, who was ordered to repay $110 million to defrauded investors, wowed his adoring fans with his address.

It was ostensibly a presentation about sales skills and how to get rich. But in reality it sounded more like a testosteronic cloud burst.

“I’m a winner,” Belfort urged the crowd to scream, which they duly did. “Everyone deserves to travel first class,” he added. He would have fitted in at Fás, back in the day.

After shelling out the price of 15 pints of Heineken and a Nando’s just to get in the door, the crowd were then repeatedly encouraged to sign up for another (far more expensive) three-day seminar by Belfort in London. You see, there is no secret to getting rich. Just find stupid people.

The gig was organised by Jamark, the media company once criticised for organising Knickers for Liquor nights in a Dublin club.

It clearly knows its customer base.

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