Waterford city shopping development gets green light

Nearly 500 jobs on way after An Bord Pleanála approves shopping centre and cafe area

Waterford city: a planned shopping development comprising a  10,030sq m shopping centre and a 635sq m cafe/restaurant area has been approved by An Bord Pleanála. Photograph: iStock

Waterford city: a planned shopping development comprising a 10,030sq m shopping centre and a 635sq m cafe/restaurant area has been approved by An Bord Pleanála. Photograph: iStock

 

An Bord Pleanála has granted permission for the construction of a new shopping development in the centre of Waterford city, which is expected to create about 480 jobs when complete.

The decision rejects appeals against the original go-ahead given to Newgate Properties Ltd by Waterford City and County Council for the project at St Stephen’s Street and New Street.

The development, which includes a four-storey car park, will feature a 10,030sq m shopping centre and a 635sq m cafe/restaurant area. Up to 250 jobs will be created during construction.

Developers have planned for one major anchor store, five “medium-size units” and 10 smaller units as well as three restaurants or cafes. The shopping centre will be bounded by Michael Street, Alexander Street, St Stephen’s Street and New Street.

There will be 385 car-parking spaces and a pedestrian bridge over New Street linking the multi-storey car park to the shopping area.

A new landscaped urban garden is being provided at the old St Stephen’s graveyard, a protected structure, and a 17th-century house is being retained.

Industrial buildings

Much of the site for the development, which is to the south of the current main thoroughfare in Waterford city, is currently occupied by industrial-type buildings, some of which were used in the past by Waterford IT but have fallen into disrepair and dereliction in recent years.

Objections to the plan had been lodged with the council by the Barrack Street/Convent Hill/Priest’s Terrace Residents’ Association and the Waterford Inner City Community Alliance, and appeals against the council’s decision to grant permission were sent to An Bord Pleanála, but the board announced Wednesday that it was agreeing with the council’s original approval, subject to a number of conditions.

These include the preparation by the developers of an archaeological assessment of the site, ensuring the preservation of any existing burials at the old graveyard and other environmental measures.