It feels like 2007 all over again as Bernard McNamara moves on site

In recent days, hoardings have been erected around the Canada House site bearing the McNamara name and the unmistakable blue and yellow of Clare, his home county

The site of the old Canada House building at St Stephen’s Green, Dublin, which is being redeveloped by Bernard McNamara for site owner Denis O’Brien. Photograph: Dave Meehan

The site of the old Canada House building at St Stephen’s Green, Dublin, which is being redeveloped by Bernard McNamara for site owner Denis O’Brien. Photograph: Dave Meehan

 

Ah, nostalgia, how are ya?

The boom is definitely getting boomier again, now that Bernard McNamara, the Big Mac of Celtic Tiger developers who later went bankrupt, is officially rebuilding Canada House in Dublin for Denis O’Brien.

It was reported earlier in the summer that McNamara was in prime position to land the contract for the €25 million office complex rebuild.

In recent days, hoardings have been erected around the St Stephen’s Green site bearing the McNamara name and the unmistakable blue and yellow of Clare, his home county.

The branding does not give the name of the company that the builder, who owed €2.7 billion at the height of the boom, is using for the job.

Nor does he appear to have registered any new company or business names recently.

O’Brien, who bought Canada House for €21 million in 2001, has wanted to revamp it for almost a decade.

It is owned by Fieldsville, whose directors include O’Brien’s wife, Catherine, and John Ryall, a long-time associate who keeps an eye on his property interests.

Documents filed with its planning application show Fieldsville has been slapped with almost €300,000 of Metro North and council development levies.

It all sounds a bit like (legal) hello money.

To O’Brien, however, it’s just walking around money.

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