Angel Di Maria on verge of Manchester United move

Carlo Ancelotti confirms Argentine has decided to leave Real Madrid

 Angel di Maria of Real Madrid is surrounded by Atletico  Madrid players during the Supercopa first leg the Santiago Bernabeu. Photograph:  Denis Doyle/Getty Images

Angel di Maria of Real Madrid is surrounded by Atletico Madrid players during the Supercopa first leg the Santiago Bernabeu. Photograph: Denis Doyle/Getty Images

 

Angel Di Maria is on the verge of leaving Real Madrid, coach Carlo Ancelotti admitted on Sunday, as the Argentine’s move to Manchester United edged closer.

“Di Maria has not trained with us today and he came in to say goodbye to the players and people at the club,” Ancelotti told a news conference in Madrid.

“We are thankful for what he has done at this club. There is nothing official yet but it is being sorted out. I am very happy with the work that he has done for Madrid but we have the chance to replace him well.

“The decision is his and the club has done what it could to keep him here but he thought differently and so good luck to him.”

Ancelotti said last week that the Argentine had been offered a new deal but instead asked to leave. It is believed that he felt undervalued and wanted an improved salary to put him in line with the club’s top earners.

Reports on Sunday suggested United were close to breaking the British transfer record for Di Maria, with the 26 year old likely to cost more than the €60 Chelsea paid Liverpool for Spain striker Fernando Torres in 2011.

Di Maria cost Real €25 million pounds from Benfica in 2010 and he was a key part of the team that won the club’s 10th European Cup last season.

The Daily Mail reported that Di Maria had already spoken with United manager Louis van Gaal about his likely role and said he was expected to be given the iconic number seven shirt worn by George Best, Eric Cantona and David Beckham.

United declined to comment on the reports.

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