Final field of 29 for the Irish Grand National

Locally trained Venitien De Mai leads the big race betting, followed by siblings Mala Beach and Bonny Kate

 Peter Roe, manager of Fairyhouse Racecourse, with last year’s  Boylesports Irish Grand National winner, Thunder and Roses. Photograph: Morgan Treacy/INPHO

Peter Roe, manager of Fairyhouse Racecourse, with last year’s Boylesports Irish Grand National winner, Thunder and Roses. Photograph: Morgan Treacy/INPHO

 

Ground conditions no worse than soft are predicated by Fairyhouse officials for Easter Monday’s €275,000 Boylesports Irish Grand National.

Venitien De Mai, trained near the track by Jim Dreaper, tops most ante-post betting lists at 8-1, followed by Mala Beach, and his full sister, Bonny Kate, at 10-1.

A final field of 29 has been declared for one of Irish racing’s most prestigious races, including eight trained by Gordon Elliott and eight owned by Michael O’Leary’s Gigginstown Stud.

Remarkably, champion trainer Willie Mullins doesn’t have a runner, freeing up Ruby Walsh to ride one of Elliott’s hopes, Bless The Wings.

The 100th anniversary of the Easter Rising will be marked by a reconstruction of All Sorts’ victory in the 1916 National.

“After the first race on Monday, we will have seven horses paraded, with people in costume. They will gallop for six furlongs and then come back in to the winner’s enclosure,” explained Fairyhouse manager, Peter Roe (left).

“If the forecast of 8-10mm of rain is correct, we’re looking at yielding to soft ground on Sunday. The weather people are flip-flopping on what rain we could get on Sunday night, but it could be 6-8mm. If we get that, it could go soft, but no worse than that,” Roe added.

There are two cross-channel-based hopefuls for Monday’s holiday highlight, Kerry Lee’s Russe Blanc, and the Jonjo O’Neill-trained Another Hero.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.