Dallas Cowboys strength and conditioning coach Markus Paul dies

54-year-old former Chicago Bears player was taking ill at NFL side’s training facility on Tuesday

 Markus Paul pictured in 2006. Photograph: Getty Images

Markus Paul pictured in 2006. Photograph: Getty Images

 

Dallas Cowboys strength and conditioning coach Markus Paul died on Wednesday after falling ill at the NFL team’s training facility on Tuesday, the team announced. He was 54.

Paul was surrounded by his family when he passed, the team said.

“The loss of a family member is a tragedy, and Markus Paul was a loved and valued member of our family,” the Cowboys said in a statement. “He was a pleasant and calming influence in our strength room and throughout The Star.”

Paul suffered a medical emergency at the Cowboys’ facility early Tuesday morning and was rushed to the hospital after getting treated by Cowboys medical personnel. The Cowboys cancelled practice and player availability.

The Cowboys practiced Wednesday and are scheduled to play their tradition Thanksgiving Day fixture against the Washington Football Team on Thursday (9.30pm Irish time).

“We extend our love, strength and support to Markus’ family during this most challenging of times and ask that their privacy be respected moving forward,” Cowboys coach Mike McCarthy said in a statement. “Markus Paul was a leader in the building.”

“It was a privilege to work with him as a coach and laugh with him as a friend. Markus did everything the right way,” McCarthy said.

Paul joined the Cowboys in 2018 and was named strength and conditioning coach by McCarthy upon his arrival.

Paul played for the Chicago Bears (1989-93), playing in 71 games (15 starts), and played one game for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

He was an assistant strength coach for the New York Giants for 11 seasons before joining the Cowboys.

He was a two-time All American at Syracuse, where he was a team captain alongside Daryl Johnston.

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