Alastair Cook thinks he’s ‘untouchable’ as England captain

Geoffrey Boycott says Cook acts as if he is the best captain England have ever had

England’s Stuart Broad, Alastair Cook and Ian Bell look dejected during the post match presentations following their series draw with the West Indies. Photo: Jason O’Brien/Reuters

England’s Stuart Broad, Alastair Cook and Ian Bell look dejected during the post match presentations following their series draw with the West Indies. Photo: Jason O’Brien/Reuters

 

Alastair Cook believes he is “untouchable” as England captain, according to Geoffrey Boycott who has launched an astonishing attack on the left-hander.

Boycott took exception to Cook’s comments towards Colin Graves in the wake of the defeat to West Indies in Barbados over the weekend, as the islanders managed to secure a shock 1-1 Test series draw.

The incoming England and Wales Cricket Board chairman labelled the West Indies “mediocre” before the series began, a comment Cook thought gave England’s opponents plenty of ammunition to put one over on the tourists.

Yet Cook telling the BBC: “That’s a Yorkshireman for you — they’re quite happy to talk a good game” struck a nerve with former England batsman and Graves’ fellow Yorkshireman Boycott.

The 74-year-old told the Daily Telegraph: “Every time Alastair Cook opens his mouth, he sticks his foot in it. We lose a Test and fail to win a series, and he blames Colin Graves.

“Graves is going to be his new boss on May 15th, yet it is unbelievable that Cook talks disrespectfully about him.

“Cook acts as if he is the best captain England have ever had. He is living in cloud-cuckoo land about his captaincy ability. He thinks he is untouchable.”

Boycott has also concluded Cook is emboldened by reports his former opening partner for England and friend Andrew Strauss is about to take the newly-created position of ECB director of cricket.

The role has been created after the managing director role was scrapped following Paul Downton’s sacking last month.

“If that is the best that Tom Harrison, the chief executive, can come up with, God help us,” added Boycott. “Why? Because Cook calls him ‘Straussy’, they opened the innings together for a long time, are best mates, shared dressing rooms.

“So Cook will be safe and captain forever, as will some other players Strauss played alongside. He is too close to so many of the current players to take an objective view.

“So don’t hold your breath for the promised changes, as we will be swapping one nice lad — Paul Downton — for another in Strauss. The more the England and Wales Cricket Board changes, the more it stays the same.”

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