Philly McMahon confident in Dublin’s defensive capabilities

Dublin corner-back yet to see Mayo’s Aidan O’Shea play as All-Ireland semi-final nears

Dublin footballer Philly McMahon at the launch of the Griffith College certificate in dual career development in sport: he said he is capable of marking any player. Photograph: Cathal Noonan/Inpho

Dublin footballer Philly McMahon at the launch of the Griffith College certificate in dual career development in sport: he said he is capable of marking any player. Photograph: Cathal Noonan/Inpho

 
Donegal

Rory O’Carroll’s primary duty on August 30th will be to silence the current front runner for footballer of the season but McMahon, Jonny Cooper and Cian O’Sullivan will be tasked with cutting supply to the 25-year-old.

“I haven’t seen Aidan O’Shea this year,” said McMahon, speaking at the launch of Griffith College’s certificate in dual career development for sports people. Not unlike most athletes, he will do anything but watch sport when gifted a rare Saturday off. “I went shopping with the girlfriend.”

So we tell him how O’Shea destroyed Galway, Sligo and now Donegal.

Look after ourselves

“I’d like to think I am confident enough to mark whoever I can in Ireland.

“[In the league game] Mayo went very defensive against us and left a lot of space in the backs. We clicked nicely. Even though we beat them well that day they have probably learned a massive amount from how we play.”

Meanwhile, Mick O’Dowd has had his contract as Meath senior football manager extended by two years.

Despite a very disappointing campaign this year, the Meath Executive Committee had previously made their support for O’Dowd clear after three years at the helm, and so after some discussion his position was not put to a vote.

O’Dowd took over at the start of the 2013 season, and despite back-to-back Leinster finals, this summer was disappointing after Westmeath ended their provincial aspirations, before Tyrone ended their summer outright.

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