Philip Reynolds asked to consider running in election

Son of former taoiseach Albert Reynolds ‘honoured’ to be asked

 Philip Reynolds with his wife Anne. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

Philip Reynolds with his wife Anne. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

 

Philip Reynolds, son of former taoiseach Albert Reynolds, has confirmed he was recently asked to consider running in the next general election by members of the local Fianna Fáil organisation in Longford.

Mr Reynolds, a businessman, said he was “honoured” to be approached. However, he stressed that he did not meet with Fianna Fáil general secretary Sean Dorgan, who oversees candidate selection.

“The guys in the local organisation in Longford did talk to me. I didn’t meet Sean. The guys locally talked to me and I was very honoured. I am still keenly interested in politics, and would love to see Fianna Fáil taking a seat in Longford, and would do whatever I can for them.”

However, Mr Reynolds said the time was not right for him. He noted that his father began his career in politics at the age of 44 and was often described as a late entrant, and pointed out he had turned 50 in December.

“I’m older now than Dad was when he went into politics. It might be time to look at the next generation of Reynolds.”

Elsewhere, the brother of disability rights activist, Joanne O’Riordan, who chronicled her story in the highly-acclaimed documentary, No Limbs, No Limits, is to run as an Independent candidate in the next general election.

Filmmaker Steven O’Riordan said he was hoping to take a seat in the three-seat Cork North West constituency which returned two Fine Gael TDs, Michael Creed and Áine Collins and one Fianna Fáil TD, Michael Moynihan, in the last general election.

Mr O’Riordan said he believed Ireland had been poorly served by the main parties, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael, which have dominated Irish politics for generations.

Mr O’Riordan identified disability rights, young people, bridging the urban rural divide, emigration and immigration, as well as Dáil reform and investment in the arts as some of the issues that he plans to campaign on in the rural three-seat constituency.