The streetlight that switches on when it sees you coming

Las Vegas, Nevada, is trialling a new low-cost, low-pollution system to light its streets

EnGoPlanet’s  solar-powered streetlights  can switch themselves on and off when people pass nearby

EnGoPlanet’s solar-powered streetlights can switch themselves on and off when people pass nearby

 

Impact Journalism Day (June 24th, 2017) focuses on solutions-based journalism. Fifty leading media organisations, including The Irish Times, are sharing stories of innovative solutions to social issues around the world, in an initiative developed by Sparknews. Read our articles here: irishtimes.com/news/impact-journalism-day and follow the conversation on Twitter through #ImpactJournalism and #StoryOfChange.

Engineers in Las Vegas, Nevada, are testing a new system to illuminate the streets of the city: solar-powered streetlights that can switch themselves on and off when people pass nearby. The aim of this invention is to reduce both pollution and electricity costs.

Located in the middle of the desert, Las Vegas enjoys high levels of sunshine throughout the year, making the city an ideal place for solar energy use. For this reason, the company EnGoPlanet recently installed four eco-friendly streetlamps on a busy square in the city.

The system is simple. A battery is connected to rounded solar panels above the streetlights that store the energy needed to illuminate the square. The battery is also connected to kinetic tiles built into the pavement. When a pedestrian walks on the slabs, the energy produced by the weight of their movement is harnessed. Thanks to small generators, each step generates 4 to 8 watts, depending on the pressure exerted.

If the system proves effective, it will be extended to other major American cities.

engoplanet.com.

This article was written by C Hallé for the French newspaper Mon Quotidien

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.