Galway bypass option would involve Corrib bridge

City transport team’s ‘preferred route’ may also require demolition of 50 houses

An view from the air of construction in Galway city. A €500 million bypass option to relieve traffic congestion in the city would involve a new bridge over the river Corrib and two short tunnels on the city’s east side.  Photograph: Joe O’Shaughnessy/The Irish Times

An view from the air of construction in Galway city. A €500 million bypass option to relieve traffic congestion in the city would involve a new bridge over the river Corrib and two short tunnels on the city’s east side. Photograph: Joe O’Shaughnessy/The Irish Times

 

A €500 million bypass option to relieve traffic congestion in Galway would involve a new bridge over the river Corrib and two short tunnels on the city’s east side, city councillors are to hear.

The N6 Galway city transport project team’s “final preferred route” may also involve the demolition of between 40 and 50 houses, if approved by An Bord Pleanála under strategic infrastructure criteria.

Some 400 landowners within a 150m corridor are being notified of the proposals this week by the project team.

The team’s preferred route, which is due to be presented to Galway city councillors on Thursday morning, involves sections of the pink and blue routes which were among six options identified earlier this year.

Opposition to route

NUI Galway (NUIG), Ballybrit racecourse and a number of residents’ groups had expressed opposition to the various routes identified earlier this year, all of which lie south of an original bypass design ruled out on environmental grounds

Lands owned by NUIG fall within the remit of the preferred route, which is under 20km long and links Barna in the west to the boundary between the city and the rest of the county in the east.

A public transport segment is also incorporated in the plan, which will be submitted to An Bord Pleanála next year after consultation with home and landowners and the preparation of an environmental impact statement.

The Department of Transport allocated €2 million last year to “reboot” the bypass project, after €14 million was spent on the previous, abandoned scheme.