Deportation appeal by man allegedly linked to Islamic terrorism due

Man claims if sent to native country he is at risk of torture and inhuman treatment

A man with alleged links to Islamic terrorism claims that, if deported to his native country, he is at risk of being tortured and subjected to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. File photograph: Getty Images

A man with alleged links to Islamic terrorism claims that, if deported to his native country, he is at risk of being tortured and subjected to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. File photograph: Getty Images

 

An appeal by a man with alleged links to Islamic terrorism against his removal from the State will be heard by the Supreme Court later this month.

The court previously granted the man’s lawyers permission to appeal a High Court order for his deportation on the basis the case raises points of law of general public importance.

The man claims that, if deported to his native country, he is at risk of being tortured and subjected to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

The appeal was briefly mentioned before Mr Justice Donal O’Donnell in the Supreme Court on Wednesday. He was told it is ready to proceed on May 31st.

Michael Lynn SC, for the man, said it should be heard in a day.

The man’s appeal is against a judgment by Mr Justice Richard Humphreys that the Minister for Justice’s decision to deport the man was lawful. The Minister held there were no substantial grounds to find the man would be at real risk of ill-treatment if deported to his home country.

Mr Justice Humphreys had refused to permit the man to bring an appeal to the Court of Appeal and also lifted a stay preventing him being removed from the State on the bass of the judge’s view that no point of law of exception public importance arose.

The appeal was briefly mentioned before Mr Justice Donal O’Donnell in the Supreme Court on Wednesday. He was told it is ready to proceed on May 31st. Photograph: Collins
The appeal was briefly mentioned before Mr Justice Donal O’Donnell in the Supreme Court on Wednesday. He was told it is ready to proceed on May 31st. Photograph: Collins

The man, in his 50s and living in Ireland for several years, cannot be identified for legal reasons. He claims his rights under Article 3 of the European Convention would be breached if he is deported.

Political views

He denies being involved in terrorism and claims he is at risk due to his political views.

The deportation order was issued after gardaí informed the Department of Justice that activities of the man and his associates are “of serious concern” and “contrary to the State’s security”.

Among its concerns, the State claims the man had been “raising money for jihadists” and was convicted of terrorism offences in France as well as in his home country.

He was convicted and jailed in France for several years for terrorist offences. He has also served a prison sentence in Ireland after being convicted of attempting to travel using forged documents.