Bram Stoker celebrated by Google

 

Google is today honouring Irish novelist Bram Stoker’s 165th birthday with one of its famous Google doodles.

The online illustration featuring characters from Stoker’s Dracula, links to series of his novels available on Google Books, unlike previous doodles which link to a Google search of the celebrated person’s name.

Stoker was born in Dublin in 1847 and studied at Trinity College. He also worked as a civil servant in Dublin Castle and reviewed theatre for a Dublin newspaper.

Throughout his career, Stoker wrote 12 novels, three short story collections and four non-fiction books. He died on April 20th, 1912 following a series of strokes.

He was recently celebrated at the Bram Stoker festival, which took place across Dublin from October 26th to 28th.

Google changes their logo regularly to signify major milestones and global events.

Stoker is not the only Irish author to be celebrated by Google recently, as Brian O’Nolan, better known as Flann O’Brien and Myles na gCopaleen, had his own Google doodle last month to mark his 101th birthday.

While Stoker’s doodle can be seen worldwide, O’Nolan’s was only available to Irish users.

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