‘Ireland seems to be allergic to the concept of serving breakfast anytime after daybreak’

Sound Off: Andrea Horan on late breakfasts

Andrea Horan in her Dublin 8 hallway. “I think it’s time for us as a country to take a long, hard look at ourselves and the stigma associated with late breakfasts,” she says. Photograph: Aidan Crawley

Andrea Horan in her Dublin 8 hallway. “I think it’s time for us as a country to take a long, hard look at ourselves and the stigma associated with late breakfasts,” she says. Photograph: Aidan Crawley

 

I’m not one of those weird “people who get up early in the morning” our mighty leader is so fond of. I love sleeping and I don’t believe there’s anything to be gained by setting your alarm clock to go off while it’s still dark outside. There’s a reason I live in a country with a moderate climate and it’s the fact that it doesn’t really get bright until 10am. If I was pressed to name my best trait, it would be always listening to experts in their field and there’s probably only one thing every expert agrees on – the importance of sleep. So I make sure I get loads of it.

I place such importance on a leisurely morning that when I opened my own business it was one that doesn’t open until 11am. Create the life you want to live and all that. The only fly in the ointment of my daily life schedule is the fact that as an eternal optimist who thinks I’ve more time that I really do, I’m always late, so never have time for breakfast. When the time comes for me to eventually whet my palate with some eggs and avocado toast (yes, I obviously still rent) the realisation hits that Ireland seems to be allergic to the concept of serving breakfast anytime after daybreak. Can we all agree that eggs taste good at any time? So why does every hint of Benedict or sausage end at 11.30am? Noon if you’re lucky.

I think it’s time for us as a country to take a long, hard look at ourselves and the stigma associated with late breakfasts. Some people’s (very productive) day starts at noon, and a stale croissant just isn’t going to cut it for a working girl on the go. It’s time for us to introduce some civility into our daily working regime, one afternoon egg at a time. And if we could go a step further and make a daily Bloody Mary acceptable as an accompaniment, I think we’d all be way more familiar with the saying “less stress, more success”.

Do you have something you’d like to Sound Off about? Email 300 words to magazine@irishtimes.com with Sound Off in the subject line

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