Home with a seasonal view in Sutton for €800,000

Split-level four-bedroom detached dormer bungalow near the seafront

 

Trader-downers in Howth and The Baily hoping to stay in the area might like number 18 South Hill, a four-bedroom detached dormer bungalow, built in 1987 and situated a short walk from the seafront in Sutton.

The split-level house’s main feature is its two interconnecting rooms to the rear, a sittingroom with a bottle gas fire and a kitchen, both of which open out onto a timber deck that faces south.

When it was built the deck boasted views across Dublin, where the owners would sit and watch lighting-up time across the city. Almost 30 years later, the sapling trees in the grounds of St Fintan’s secondary school, which backs onto the property, have matured and obscure the view in summer. At this time of the year you can still see the water through the bare branches.

The high evergreen hedge makes the space feel private and helps buffer the sea breezes. The large raised koi pond in the lawned part of the garden may have a more limited appeal.

There are two more rooms to the front of the house, a formal sittingroom and a TV room currently housing toys belonging to the couple’s grandchildren.

The house has four bedrooms. You can see the summit from the master bedroom, which has a shower ensuite bathroom.

It is a two-minute walk to the sea at Strand Road where you can take the low road and amble past Sutton Sailing Club towards Sutton Strand or take the high road, up the hill of Howth’s cliff walk.

The BER rating for the house is C3. The property, which measures 162sq m (1750sq ft), is asking €800,000 through agents Gallagher Quigley.

There is potential to extend the house to the side, subject to planning. The agents asked Tyler Owens Architects to draft plans to better illustrate possible options.

Gallagher Quigley recently sold number 20 South Hill, similar in style and orientation, for €800,000.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.